Get Connected
  • facebook
  • Sign In
  • Classifieds
  • Sections
Print

Buffalo Heritage Days highlights pioneer skills

Bob Walden shows Buffalo Elementary School students a handmade spear at Buffalo Heritage Days. Waldon also demonstrated “flint knapping.” Flintknapping is a process of chipping away material from high silica stones like “flint” in a carefully controlled manner with special tools to produce sharp projectile points or tools.
BEN CALWELL | Putnam Review Doug Wood as Cherokee leader Ostenaco helps Buffalo Elementary School kindergarten teacher Crissy Rinick balance a load of deer hides on her back using a “tumpline” during Buffalo Heritage Days on Friday, May 12, at the Buffalo Academy in the Buffalo Historic Square. Wood portrays Ostenaco as part of the West Virginia Humanities Council’s History Alive! program.
Buffalo Elementary second-grader Levi Abshire helps basket maker Jessica Reed make a basket at Buffalo Heritage Days. A variety of local artisans were on hand demonstrating pioneer crafts.
Blacksmith Rick Pennington pounds metal on an anvil as Buffalo Elementary School students observe. Pennington got his fire going by using sparks from a piece of flint.
Buffalo Elementary kindergarten student Brianna Glover makes soap with the help of her teacher, Crissy Rinick. Linda Smith Meadows of Cross Lanes taught the students how to make “felted” soap.
Wanda Melton and Daisy Thornton demonstrated quilt making inside the Buffalo Academy during Buffalo Heritage Days.
Leah Higginbotham, chairwoman and treasurer of the Buffalo Historical Society, said Buffalo Heritage Days got started in the early 1990s as a way to keep history alive for young people.

Buffalo Heritage Days brought the area’s pioneering past to life for students at Buffalo Elementary School earlier this month.

The annual event, featuring artisans and historic re-enactors, was held Friday and Saturday, May 12-13, at the historic Buffalo Academy in the Buffalo Historic Square.

Leah Higginbotham, chairwoman and treasurer of the Buffalo Historical Society, said the event got started in the early 1990s as a way to call attention to Buffalo’s history.

“When we started, it was a three or four-day event,” Higginbotham said, as a group of kindergarten students made soap at a nearby table.

There were a variety of demonstrations and displays, including a blacksmith and basket makers. Doug Wood, of the Mary Ingles Trail Associates was there portraying Cherokee leader Ostenaco.

The event included:

Field Soap Making: Linda Smith Meadows of Cross Lanes

Blacksmith: Rick Pennington

Flint Knapping: Bob Waldon of Poca

Basket Making: Reed Family Baskets from Buffalo

Quilting: Women of Buffalo United Methodist Church

Coopering: (Wooden Bucket Making): Joe Smith

As well as recounting Buffalo’s earliest history, Heritage Days also featured living history with the Buffalo Academy Reunion on Saturday, May 13.


Print

User Comments